A list by Lorrita Morgan
Profile
Lorrita Morgan
Reader
Not Available
Flatland
Edwin A. Abbott
Interesting social commentary
0
Add Reply
Agree (148)
Life's too short (34)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Things Fall Apart
Chinua Achebe
Sad story of the clash of tradition and colonialism
0
Add Reply
Agree (249)
Life's too short (33)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Douglas Adams
Agree (436)
Life's too short (46)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Watership Down
Richard Adams
One of the most phenomenal international bestsellers of the 1970s, Watership Down is an immersive saga that traverses great themes and feelings—courage, frailty, community, ecology, responsibility, friendship, love—while holding readers on the edge of their metaphorical seats. And oh, yes—it’s a 500...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (243)
Life's too short (21)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Little Women
Louisa May Alcott
The classic coming of age story for females
0
Add Reply
Agree (312)
Life's too short (25)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
Sherman Alexie
Too true
0
Add Reply
Agree (104)
Life's too short (14)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Fairy Tales
Hans Christian Andersen
Part of the Western collective subconscious
0
Add Reply
Agree (137)
Life's too short (3)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
The Arabian Nights
Is there an entry in the annals of story more charming than the tale of the brave and brilliant Shahrazad, who, by dint of cunning and invention, puts off her death at the hands of King Shahryār for a thousand and one nights? Bewitching the king with a nightly dose of suspenseful storytelling, she s...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (100)
Life's too short (7)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Foundation: The Foundation Trilogy, Book 1
Isaac Asimov
As a writer, Isaac Asimov’s reputation rests solidly on his ambitious Foundation Trilogy, which was awarded a special Hugo Award in 1966 as best science fiction series of all time. And although he would bow to fan pressure and resume the franchise nearly thirty years after publishing its initial ins...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (138)
Life's too short (23)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Foundation and Empire: The Foundation Trilogy, Book 2
Isaac Asimov
While Asimov’s saga nowadays seems less original than when it first appeared, the sweep of its conception maintains a thrilling freshness. Humanity spreads throughout the galaxy (there are, notably, no aliens to contend with) and reaches a developmental peak after 12,000 years, typified by the uber-...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (98)
Life's too short (18)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Second Foundation: The Foundation Trilogy, Book 3
Isaac Asimov
Asimov’s penchant for discursive logic and brains over brawn does not prevent the Foundation series from being enthralling. Even today, ranked against all that has followed, it glows with quiet majesty.
0
Add Reply
Agree (89)
Life's too short (19)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Cat's Eye
Margaret Atwood
There are few reading pleasures more delightful than the feeling of instant rapport a narrative voice can conjure, an intimacy that quickly becomes immersive as you are drawn into a confidence both close and resonant. In Cat’s Eye, the voice belongs to Elaine Risley, a painter who has come back to h...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (51)
Life's too short (15)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
The Handmaid's Tale
Margaret Atwood
Suzanne Nelson brought an unorthodox approach to her presentation of The Handmaid's Tale, employing actors in costume and handheld signs underscoring the hypocrisy of the patriarchal society at the center of Atwood's novel at the Ridgefield Battle of 11/14/19.
0
Add Reply
Agree (84)
Life's too short (11)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Emma
Jane Austen
At twenty, Emma Woodhouse—“handsome, clever, and rich”—knows that she’s the most fantastic woman in Highbury, and nothing amuses her more than meddling in other people’s affairs. But although she has good intentions, her matchmaking goes seriously awry, wrecking a perfectly good engagement for her f...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (156)
Life's too short (17)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Mansfield Park
Jane Austen
From a large and not too wealthy family, bashful Fanny Price is sent to live with her rich aunt and uncle at the house that gives this book its name. She finds herself intimidated by everyone there, except her kind cousin Edmund; constantly bursting into tears, she won’t even take part in her coeval...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (98)
Life's too short (18)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Pride and Prejudice
Jane Austen
The best introduction to Austen’s work is surely the second of the six novels she wrote before her death at only forty-one, Pride and Prejudice, in which she introduces us to Elizabeth Bennet, the wittiest and most vivacious of five sisters on the hunt—if their mother has her way, at least—for husba...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (277)
Life's too short (21)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Sense and Sensibility
Jane Austen
Austen’s first published novel, which appeared under the pseudonym “A Lady,” is the story of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, and of the tension between private passions and public decorum. This is Austen’s most social novel, and in both town and country, she depicts a privileged class rif...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (151)
Life's too short (19)
Want to read
Post Comment