A list by Cara Duncan
Profile
Cara Duncan
Librarian
Not Available
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
Sherman Alexie
Drawing on Sherman Alexie’s personal experience growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian is a young adult novel that has more to say about big virtues like tolerance than a whole shelf of earnest adult tomes could ever manage. The book’s unflinchi...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (40)
Life's too short (3)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Watership Down
Richard Adams
Watership Down has been a favorite of mine since my Dad read it aloud to me when I was perhaps 5 or 6. It stands up to multiple readings!
0
Add Reply
Agree (101)
Life's too short (9)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Half of a Yellow Sun
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Set in Nigeria during the decade culminating in the 1967–70 Biafran war, a secession conflict that left more than a million dead from violence and famine, this story is at once a historical drama and a tale of family struggles and romances gone right and wrong. Half of a Yellow Sun established Adich...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (21)
Life's too short (5)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
Maya Angelou
When you discover that a person has written six books of autobiography, you’re bound to wonder: Is she just a prolific narcissist, or has she really lived a six-volume life? If she’s Maya Angelou, there’s no doubt that the latter is the case: So compelling is her private story, so extravagant her pu...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (60)
Life's too short (6)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
The Arabian Nights
Is there an entry in the annals of story more charming than the tale of the brave and brilliant Shahrazad, who, by dint of cunning and invention, puts off her death at the hands of King Shahryār for a thousand and one nights? Bewitching the king with a nightly dose of suspenseful storytelling, she s...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (44)
Life's too short (2)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Meditations
Marcus Aurelius
Perhaps even more than the great Athenian statesman Pericles, the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius fulfilled Plato’s notion of the philosopher-king. He was well trained for the role, having been handpicked by Hadrian at the age of eight to succeed that imperial luminary. The beneficiary of the finest e...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (48)
Life's too short (1)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Persuasion
Jane Austen
Persuasion is my favorite of Jane Austen!
0
Add Reply
Agree (58)
Life's too short (7)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Pride and Prejudice
Jane Austen
The best introduction to Austen’s work is surely the second of the six novels she wrote before her death at only forty-one, Pride and Prejudice, in which she introduces us to Elizabeth Bennet, the wittiest and most vivacious of five sisters on the hunt—if their mother has her way, at least—for husba...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (116)
Life's too short (12)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Fahrenheit 451
Ray Bradbury
Guy Montag is a fireman. But, in the dystopian future of Ray Bradbury’s 1953 classic, a fireman’s duty is not to put out fires, but to start them. His job, in fact, is to burn books, a task that requires the temperature of 451° Fahrenheit. It’s natural to see Fahrenheit 451 as an allegory about cens...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (100)
Life's too short (7)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
The Piano Shop on the Left Bank
Thad Carhart
Every morning, as he walked his children to school through his Paris neighborhood, American transplant Thad Carhart passed a modest storefront that intrigued him. “Desforges Pianos: outillage, fournitures” announced its stenciled sign, and the tools and components of piano repair displayed in its wi...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (5)
Life's too short (2)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Don Quixote
Miguel de Cervantes
In the story of Don Quixote, a misguided hero besotted by popular romances of chivalry and steadied only by the hands of a capable and long-suffering companion, Sancho Panza, Cervantes managed to depict—in comedy high and low and in episodes alternately satiric, hilarious, and moving—the battle betw...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (35)
Life's too short (5)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
The Canterbury Tales
Geoffrey Chaucer
The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer’s most enduring work, began in the 1380s as a loose collection of stories, myths, and fantastical anecdotes—most in verse, though some in prose—that were all written in different voices. Only in the 1390s did Chaucer start to think of his baggy assemblage as a single na...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (45)
Life's too short (4)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
The Man Who Was Thursday
G. K. Chesterton
Although no single volume sums up the pleasures of reading G. K. Chesterton, the inquisitive reader might well begin with The Man Who Was Thursday, one of several works in a vein of speculative fiction that Chesterton plied with idiosyncratic ingenuity. A plot that begins with a discussion of freedo...show more
1
Add Reply
Agree (17)
Life's too short (2)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Between the World and Me
Ta-Nehisi Coates
Ta-Nehisi Coates’s book is prompted in part by his inability to offer any comfort to his son after the latter’s disillusionment in the aftermath of the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and the exoneration of the police officers at whose hands he died: “I did not tell you that it would...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (25)
Life's too short (3)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
The Complete Sherlock Holmes
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
While the success of the Sherlock Holmes tales can properly be seen as a catalyst for the boom in crime and detective literature that began in the early twentieth century and seems to grow larger every year, the pleasure of Arthur Conan Doyle’s narratives rests only in part on the cleverly contrived...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (49)
Life's too short (1)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Robinson Crusoe
Daniel Defoe
Inspired by the real-life experience of Alexander Selkirk (1676–1721), a Scottish sailor who was marooned for more than four years on a South Pacific island, Robinson Crusoe gave enduring form to fundamental themes of the Western imagination. With his parrot and parasol, the castaway Crusoe is an e...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (36)
Life's too short (2)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
David Copperfield
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield is a novel so filled with character, invention, suspense, and inspired storytelling that one finishes it with an overwhelming regret: The turning of the last page closes the book on such a vivid world that one feels immediately impoverished. Dickens famously called Copperfield the ...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (28)
Life's too short (5)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
A Christmas Carol
Charles Dickens
You know the story of this quintessential holiday tale, but have you ever read it? So many times has the tale been told—in numerous stage and screen adaptations—that we are apt to take the power of its invention for granted. Yet no retelling comes close to capturing the humor and human sympathy, the...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (68)
Life's too short (5)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Middlemarch
George Eliot
I met James Mustich at the 2018 ALA conference and when he asked me for one of my favorites, I told him that I had recently read and loved Middlemarch. It remains in my heart as one of my favorite books of all time.
0
Add Reply
Agree (15)
Life's too short (3)
Want to read
Post Comment
Not Available
Johnny Tremain
Esther Forbes
Enlivening already thrilling historical events with vivid characters and page-turning drama, Esther Forbes’s novel of the American Revolution—and of Johnny Tremain’s personal and political adventures in the shadow of the looming rebellion—has remained a favorite of young readers for decades. Peopled...show more
0
Add Reply
Agree (17)
Life's too short
Want to read
Post Comment