The Call of the Wild
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The Call of the Wild
Jack London
Children’s
Aug 20, 2018
Like Buck, the big dog that is this book’s protagonist, the reader of The Call of the Wild is swiftly and irrevocably swept from the “sun-kissed” world of its opening pages into a realm of elemental and unsparing experience. A favorite of his owner, Buck has known a placid, even pampered life in California’s Santa Clara Valley—until the day this “sated aristocrat” is dog-napped and finds himself “jerked from the heart of civilization and flung into the heart of things primordial.” Sold first to a man supplying sled dogs to those caught up in the Klondike gold rush of the late 1890s, and then to a pair of Canadian government couriers, Buck soon learns that, in order to survive in the harsh Northland, he must submit to “the law of club and fang.” Instincts long dormant begin to reawaken in him, and London thrillingly depicts the process of Buck’s “decivilization” as he acclimates himself to his alluring, impulsive new life. Even as he develops bonds of loyalty and love with one master, John Thornton, Buck is remade by the wild into a fierce and merciless creature, eventually abandoning the world of men altogether. That, in brief, is the story of The Call of the Wild, a book that—despite the way its subject and style contrasted with the gentility of contemporary popular fiction—was an immediate sensation, earning Jack London’s place in the public eye as the most celebrated author of his day. A hundred years later, readers are still falling under its spell.
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Dec 2, 2018
Read and loved this as a boy. Would I like it today?
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Mar 27, 2019
Naturalism and the primitive told from the wolf's point of view (without being campy). This is a wonderful novel.
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Oct 3, 2019
Read it as a boy, and loved it.
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