A Clockwork Orange
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A Clockwork Orange
Anthony Burgess
Literature
Jul 31, 2018
Alex, the frightening narrator of this brutal and brilliant novel, is an amoral, Beethoven-loving gang leader in a near-future dystopian Britain. Whether adolescent girls or a schoolteacher returning from the library, the gang’s victims are treated with an exuberantly vicious disregard: They might as well be faceless, inhuman targets for the random acts of violence, the gratuitous venom of Alex and his thugs (sex, unsurprisingly, is reduced to its mechanical coordinates: “the old in-out-in-out”). The linguistic bravura of the book and the unbound rebellion that is described do not hide for long the philosophical inquiry into good and evil at the core of A Clockwork Orange. Though it’s often compared to 1984 and Brave New World, Anthony Burgess’s book—in part a vision, both prescient and exaggerated, of the coming trauma of youth culture—has an extra layer of surreality and menace. Burgess is more interested in invoking questions than answering them, and he puts his considerable imaginative powers to work in the service of his inquisition. The result for the reader is a vivid tour of an unforgettable future—a journey that remains both intellectually invigorating and deeply unsettling.
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Oct 28, 2018
Horrifying dystopia. Brilliant descriptions of psychopathy
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Nov 4, 2018
the language in this is incredible--the reader quickly adapts to it, which I found fascinating in itself.
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It could happen. One needs to know that even if you disagree, there are boundaries.
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Alarming, shocking and surreal.
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I hated this book, mainly because it was prophetic. Sadly, a lot of this violence exists.
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Essential angst-ridden book of failed reform. Do find a copy with the restored ending chapters.
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